Logico’s game-changer   

Phumzile Dlamini is a 27-year-old single mother, who initially joined Logico as a cleaner and general helper in order to provide an additional income for her mother and little boy.

Six years ago, at just three months old, her son Luyanda was diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP), a condition that keeps him confined to a wheelchair and unable to perform everyday tasks unaided.

After his diagnosis, Phumzile was forced to give up her job at a retail store to provide full-time care for Luyanda until he reached a school-going age.

During her short time at Logico, Phumzile has moved from her role as a cleaner to that of part-time receptionist and office worker.

“The most valuable lesson I have learned here at Logico is something very simple. I am a very shy person, but working here has taught me that asking questions is more important than saying “I know” and not really understanding. The more you ask, the more you know,” Phumzile said.

Luyanda remains Phumzile’s main priority and her current working hours have allowed her to be readily available to her son, before and after school – while working on building a career for herself.

Phumzile is passionate about creating a better life for her family and recently added to her already abundant list of duties by signing up for Admin Learnership course under the guidance of Logico and office manager, Angela Scott.

“Logico has given me a huge opportunity, because I want to make a better life for my son and my mother Monica. I want her to know that she can rely on someone else when the time comes for her retirement and I want for my son to have the best life I can give him.”

Aside from carving out a spot of her own in the business world, Phumzile is an ardent supporter of the CP community and wants to one day create an NGO that will educate the public about the condition.

“It’s distressing when people don’t want to touch your child because they think it’s something you can catch. All I want is for him and children like him to be accepted for who they are. I want to be able to teach people about these kids.”

The most valuable lesson: “… asking questions is more important than saying “I know” and not really understanding. The more you ask, the more you know.”